Letters to the Editor, March 4, 2007

Do you understand the word 'illegal'?

Editor:

I would like to know and understand why our politicians don't get or understand the word "illegal." We have more money going out to round up "illegal" criminals, and pay for social services that most of us don't qualify for. I wish we had 4,000 Joe Arpaio's. We have groups of "illegals" protesting and telling us what we will or will not do. As far as I'm concerned, you can't build a fence long enough or high enough. I am disgusted that "our" National Guard has to retreat when armed criminals come across the border. Why don't we just put down a red carpet and let any and all walk all over us? You can thank the likes of King George and Sen. Kennedy and Reid and McCain for putting out the welcome mat.

M.L. Townsend

Cottonwood

We support United Way

Editor:

Last July, the United Way of Yavapai County told the community about their precarious financial situation. The agencies were concerned about the future of the organization and how this would impact our communities and, of course, the United Way partner agencies.

Since that time, the United Way has actively involved us in their transition from crisis to community commitment. Tammy Amble Linn, the new executive director, promised us three things: 1) she would always be honest with us; 2) work hard for us; 3) and respect us in every situation. She, her staff and board have done thatŠand more. Even though the United Way is short-staffed (like many of our agencies), they have initiated new service projects that have benefited our clients and hundreds of our neighbors.

The Courier has covered the numerous toy drives that the United Way was involved in to benefit children of low income families, foster children, struggling teens and children dealing with illnesses in rural communities; "Project Stay Warm" in which the United Way coordinated a well-organized firewood distribution in Yavapai County; and now they're working with youth groups to deliver firewood to homebound persons for their only source of heat - wood-burning stoves and fireplaces In addition, they are in the process of coordinating and working with all the schools in Yavapai County in the "Packages from Home" drive in Arizona. This spring they plan send over 1000 packages and letters to soldiers serving in the military.

The United Way of Yavapai County has extended their hand to many agencies and individuals who were previously not part of the network of assistance and communication. The United Way has proven to us that they are committed to doing more than raising funds for our agencies. They are committed to doing whatever it takes to make long-term sustainable community impact through strong community partnerships and collaborations. Working together with our United Way, all of us will make a difference in the lives of every resident within the communities of Yavapai County. We support our United Way and hope you will too.

The Participating Agencies of the United Way of Yavapai County:

Coalition for Compassion and Justice (CCJ)

Neighbor to Neighbor

Community Health Center of Yavapai

People Who Care

Highlands Center for Natural History

Kudos to Kudos

Editor:

Just a note to compliment Kudos, and specifically Michelle Borgwardt, for her fine coverage of our Emerging Artists concerts, which took place this weekend. Michelle took the initiative in interviewing our two teenage guest artists from New York (and me as their local contact person) and produced a fine feature article as well as cover.

As a result our attendance figures were significantly bolstered (and with a sizable youth component), the orchestra feels proud, the guest artists' careers are encouraged and the community is educated and enriched by the Kudos coverage.

Thank you for your intelligent and generous approach to local arts and entertainment.

Marion Maby

Concertmaster and board member of the Verde Valley Sinfonietta

Illegal immigration issues return

Editor:

Like Nero, the governor has fiddled while the empire has been burning. Finally a few have decided it's time to call out the fire brigade.

Isn't it strange how illegal immigration, so important before her re-election, simply dropped off the stage once the votes were counted? Now, it has come back full force.

So unafraid of any response, Mexico's drug and human smuggling thugs have moved their war north of the border. In the last month five blatant attacks on, and kidnapping of, illegals have occurred closer and closer to our state capitol.

Media response has been predictable. Since the days of illegals being called wetbacks, the terminology has advanced through "illegal aliens" and up to "undocumented migrants." One of the attacks was described by the Arizona Republic as being committed by "bandits," implying that police hadn't ruled out racist vigilantes as perps. Next we'll be seeing these thugs affectionately called "frito-banditos."

As the father of a police officer, I am concerned that the willingness of these criminals to kill officials, soldiers and police on the Mexican side will soon move into our country.

We can no longer wait for our federal government, and certainly not the Mexican government, to help. Border Patrol officers are out-manned and out-gunned.

The idea of enlisting our police forces to aid in stopping the flow is finally being recognized as necessary. Maybe the governor can now be convinced to put National Guard Troops with better weaponry in cars with the Border Patrol. If they are not federalized, these troops can be utilized for hands-on border enforcement.

Jim Barber

Camp Verde

We've made our choice

Editor:

There are seven candidates running for Camp Verde Town Council. In the Primary at least two will be eliminated. We are voting for those candidates we consider most qualified and ready to serve if elected: Alan Buchanan, Norma Garrison and Mike Parry. If they make the "Finals" we will vote for them again.

Clive N. and Noel B. Jordan

Camp Verde

Heroes can expect cookies

Editor:

On Feb. 9, the Cottonwood Fire Department and Verde Valley Medical EMTs responded to our 911 call from Dead Horse State Park, Lime Kiln Trail, half a mile from the trailhead. Our 83-year-old mother had fallen, breaking her ankle. Thanks to an excellent rescue operation our mother is recuperating well with plans to bake cookies for her own personal heroes.

We would like to express our sincere gratitude and appreciation to those heroes.

The family of Wilma Heidenreich

Cottonwood

Diane Joens for Mayor

Editor:

My husband and I moved to Cottonwood five years ago and have come to love the Verde Valley and this town and appreciate our good fortune in living in this area of small town values, open spaces and wonderful views.

That is why we are supporting Diane Joens for mayor. We have seen her work tirelessly to maintain and improve our community, through her work not only on the City Council but with Stewards of Public Lands, Yavapai County Water Advisory Committee and many other public services. We respect her commitment to this town and its people and look forward to seeing her serve our town and preserve our unique way of life as a great mayor.

Carol Lucas

Cottonwood

Be water wise: Learn the facts

Editor:

In the Feb. 2 issue of the Verde Independent it was reported that at a meeting of tri-cities officials, Chino Valley council member Jim Bunker stated, "Verde Valley officials seem to be looking for ways to limit population growth in the basin, and instead they should be looking for ways to bring in more water."

Our region has had less than average precipitation in 11 of the past 12 years. Some climatologists believe this drought could last 20-30 years based on tree ring and ocean temperature studies. So I have been wondering exactly where those supplies might be found. Let's look at some commonly suggested sources.

The Colorado River? Since each state's share was determined during a wet cycle, it is already over allocated. The National Research Council reported last week that rising temperatures could result in reduced flows. Furthermore, the Central Arizona Project (CAP) has junior partner status meaning that in times of shortage, Arizona's portion is first to be reduced.

Lake Powell? Levels in Lake Powell have been steadily declining the past decade and it is now at 50-percent capacity. Also as Upper Basin states develop, less water will reach Lake Powell. If a 30-mile pipeline to Prescott is estimated to cost 140 million, what might be the cost of a 150-mile-plus pipeline from Lake Powell?

More wells and pumping? Many well levels are dwindling and new wells must be drilled deeper. The Prescott AMA is not in safe yield at present population levels. In the Verde Valley deeper drilling often results in increased arsenic content.

Recharge the aquifer with effluent? Numerous studies are showing that endocrine disrupting compounds from drugs, pesticides and even detergents are not removed at wastewater treatment plants and are then found in surface and groundwater supplies. These compounds disrupt the ways animals' bodies use and react to hormones. Effects include altering sex ratios and increased hermaphrodism in aquatic life. In humans increases in breast cancer and egg damage and decreased testosterone and sperm counts are observed. Do we really want to recharge our groundwater aquifers with effluent?

Conservation? This could allow our supplies to last longer whether through education or edict. However, will the public support the required lifestyle changes (fewer lawns and gardens) if this supply is perceived as being used to allow new growth?

Many communities plan for economic development to create jobs that will allow our children and grandchildren to stay in their hometowns. We must use the same level of planning for our water resources. Should we continue to allow rapid growth when faced with evidence of insufficient supplies? Good decision-making takes all living things and future generations into account. Let's focus on the long-term picture and be wise stewards.

Bob Rothrock

Cottonwood

Thanks for good citizenship

Editor:

I want to thank the anonymous person who so honestly and selflessly found my purse and turned it in intact to our Cottonwood Wal-Mart on Monday. Deeds like this should not go unrewarded. You have my deepest gratitude and are a credit to the human race.

Beth Blay

Cornville

United Way makes comeback

Editor:

Last July, the United Way of Yavapai County told the community about their precarious financial situation. We were not only devastated but very concerned about the future of the organization and how this would negatively impact our communities and, of course, the United Way partner agencies.

Since that time, the United Way has actively involved us in their transition from crisis to community commitment. Tammy Amble Linn, the new executive director, promised us three things: that she would always be honest with us; work hard for us; and respect us in every situation. She, her staff and board have done that ... and more. Even though they are short-staffed (like many of our agencies), they have initiated new service projects that have benefited our clients and hundreds of our neighbors. The Courier covered the numerous toy drives that the United Way was involved in to benefit children of low income families, foster children, struggling teens and children dealing with illnesses in rural communities; "Project Stay Warm" in which the United Way coordinated a well-organized firewood distribution in Yavapai County; and now they're working with youth groups to deliver firewood to homebound persons for their only source of heat - wood-burning stoves and fireplaces In addition, they are in the process of coordinating and working with all the schools in Yavapai County in the "Packages from Home" drive in Arizona. They hope to send over 1,000 packages and letters this spring to members of the military serving overseas.

As you can tell, the United Way of Yavapai County has extended their hand to many agencies and individuals who previously were not part of the network of assistance and communication. The United Way has proven to us that they are committed to doing more than raising funds for our agencies. They are committed to doing whatever it takes to make long-term sustainable community impact through strong community partnerships and collaborations. Working together with our United Way, all of us will make a difference in the lives of every resident within the communities of Yavapai County. We support our United Way and hope you will too.

Arizona Children's Association

Arizona Women's Education and Employment (AWEE)

Camp Verde Adult Reading Program

Catholic Charities

Chino Valley Food Bank

Coalition for Compassion and Justice (CCJ)

Community Legal Services of Yavapai County

Girl Scouts ­ Arizona Cactus-Pine Council

Highlands Center for Natural History

NAU Senior Corps Programs of Northern Arizona

Neighbor to Neighbor

Northland Cares

Parenting Arizona

People Who Care

Prescott Child Development Center

Prescott Meals On Wheels

The American Red Cross

Turning Point

Yavapai Family Advocacy Center

Yavapai Senior Nutrition Program

Candidates deserve close scrutiny

Editor:

The choice in the upcoming Mayor and Council election is fairly straightforward and not all that complicated. You have two men running for Mayor and two basic visions for Camp Verde.

If you want some reasonable economic development, which really means the availability of some decent jobs in the future for your children and grandchildren, if they happen to want to remain in the Verde Valley, then you should vote for Mitch Dickinson. You should also vote for the council candidates that share the same basic vision, Mr. Greg Elmer, Mr. Harry Duke, and Mrs. Jackie Baker. Your children and grandchildren will thank you in the future.

If you want Camp Verde to remain a bedroom community serving the business interests of Cottonwood and Sedona then you should vote for Mr. Gioia. Which means no job development, no tax base, no available funds for the Town to provide services to the citizens of Camp Verde. You should also vote for the council candidates that share the same basic vision of a bedroom community, Mr. Parry, Mr. Wischmeyer and Mr. Buchanan. The business interests of Cottonwood and Sedona will thank you in the future.

If you are confused because both candidates for mayor and both slates of council candidates seem to 'say' they share the first vision and not the second vision. The answer is also fairly straightforward and not all that complicated. Just examine the record of what they have done, not what they have 'said' they want to do. That will clearly show who does what they say, who walks the walk, and who merely says one thing and does the other.

Beck Hubbell

Camp Verde

How do I make these annoying calls stop?

Editor:

With Mitch Dickinson pulling his hair to show his concern about bringing jobs to Camp Verde, what a surprise it has been to be receiving so many phone calls from an out of state phone bank. For the last two and a half weeks I have received the harassing calls four to six times a day.

They all come from a 903 prefix, which I have discovered is an industrial strength phone service out of Tyler, Texas. From what I understand from their Chamber of Commerce, such annoyances are an industry in Tyler.

Combine this out of town industry with the fact he is using an out-of-town campaign manager and I have to ask my self if getting him back his job is worth sending so much work out of Camp Verde.

The only other question puzzling me is if I am not voting for Mitch, how do I make these annoying calls stop.

Bertie Lightfoot

Camp Verde

Not swayed by Texas robo-call

Editor:

We received a campaign call this last week. The caller ID showed "TEXAS" with a phone number of "903-000-0000."

The message was a canned one from the candidate who has received thousands of dollars in campaign funds from out-of-town contributions.

The candidate used a calling center in Texas? He could have paid someone locally to make the calls, but did he?

I do not want to be called by a robo-call by this candidate, much less an actual call from him. Mitch did not get my vote and would never have gotten it after getting that robo-call from a hidden number in TEXAS.

This is a small town where this kind of politics is not justified. Think of what the spending for a political consultant could have done for adult literacy or an after-school program.

Patricia George

Camp Verde

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