Safe haven this holiday season

The Verde Valley Humane Society Pet of the Week is a beautiful young cat named “Athena.”  She loves people and attention. She has quite the little personality too.  Of course Athena’s adoption fee has also been discounted to half price.

The Verde Valley Humane Society Pet of the Week is a beautiful young cat named “Athena.” She loves people and attention. She has quite the little personality too. Of course Athena’s adoption fee has also been discounted to half price.

Today I would like to make a special announcement to everyone. We have a special surprise for all of you.

All of our cats and kittens are going to be half price. This has been made possible thanks to generous supporters this holiday season.

Of course the animals will still be spayed/neutered, given a rabies vaccination, up to date on vaccinations, micro-chipped and come with a free five-day vet visit.

This is one of the ways we can say thank you to the community and help the animals at the same time. Please take advantage of this special savings.

At this time we are at max capacity with cats and kittens and would like to see everyone adopted before the holidays arrive.

We have a huge assortment of beautiful felines. If you open your heart, I’m pretty sure that someone will steal your heart.

Adopting an animal isn’t like going on a shopping spree and while you are out you will get an animal. Yes, unfortunately some people look at adopting in that manner.

This decision needs to be totally thought out. Adoption is a huge commitment on your part. Think it out, write down the pros and cons.

Everyone at VVHS believes in our motto. “Adopt for Life.” We hope that’s the way you feel too.

Remember when planning your visit that all of our animals go to the vet before they go into their new homes. He or she will not be going home with you that same day.

This gives you time to prepare for your new addition and them time to get a well check and surgery before their new life begins.

Adopting now will help new furry friends settle in before things get hectic. There is time to learn the “house rules” and create a happy home for everyone.

Take your time before you come in to adopt. You may even want to visit several times before you make your choice. Learning an animal’s personality is so helpful before taking them home.

You may want a calm animal but fall in love with the looks of a very active animal. Speak to our staff members, they can tell you about all of the animals. Choose wisely.

Adopting an animal isn’t like going on a shopping spree and while you are out you will get an animal.

This decision needs to be totally thought out. Adoption is a huge commitment on your part. Think it out, write down the pros and cons.

Everyone at VVHS believes in our motto. “Adopt for Life.” We hope that’s the way you feel too.

Remember when planning your visit that all of our animals go to the vet before they go into their new homes. He or she will not be going home with you that same day.

This gives you time to prepare for your new addition and them time to get a well check and surgery before their new life begins.

Although the special at this time is about our feline friends, I would like to give you some information for newly adopted dogs.

Our adoptions have been excellent and we would like the entire experience to be wonderful for you and your new furry friend.

Today I am going to talk about a choice that you may want to consider when you take your new dog home.

Each year thousands of good pets are mistreated, abused, isolated, or abandoned by their owners because their owners were unable to deal with the behavioral problems of their pets.

At times people choose methods that are almost inhumane to try to correct issues that their animal has acquired.

One of the most effective methods that has been said to correct behavior issues is to crate train the animal.

When used correctly, the purpose of the crate is to provide a secure short-term confinement area for safety, housebreaking, and protection of household goods, travel, illness, or general control.

It is said that veterinarians and professional dog handlers have accepted, trusted, and routinely used dog crates since their inception.

It is the individual pet owners, who for the most part, have rejected the idea of using a dog crate.

For many pet owners, the first reaction is “It’s like living in jail, it’s cruel. I’d never put my dog in a cage.” At times there is no other choice when negative behavior becomes an issue.

Using a crate can help eliminate the stress that owners feel when a pet displays undesirable behavior.

It can be a win-win solution for all concerned. Wouldn’t you have a much better time while you were out if you didn’t have to worry about what your pet was doing next?

Your best friend will also feel much better when he doesn’t receive the much dreaded scolding that usually happens when you arrive home.

Just remember, not many parents would even consider raising a child without a playpen or a crib to sleep in.

Animals, just like children need our guidance and protection. As responsible adults, we need to take the necessary steps to keep them safe and free from danger. Not too much to ask from us, is it?

Dogs are known to have a den instinct. The dog crate helps to satisfy this need. If your canine could talk, he would probably say, “I love having a place of my own; I have my blanket, my favorite toys, nobody bothers me in here, it’s all mine.” To you it is a “cage” and to him, it is “home.”

If crate trained, your pet can be spared the isolation of being in a basement, garage, or the backyard.

He can be included in family outings, rather than left alone or in a boarding kennel. Use a crate, but don’t abuse a crate.

First of all, choose a crate of adequate size. There should be room for the dog to turn around and stretch out on his side.

He should also be able to sit up without hitting his head. Place a towel or small rug in the bottom of the crate to keep him warm.

Throw in an old unlaundered shirt that belongs to you so he can get your scent. On the other hand, if the crate is too large for a small dog, he may start using one end as a potty.

Don’t force him into the crate and fasten the door. It takes time to properly train your dog to the crate.

At first, toss in a tidbit of his favorite food and leave the door open. Maybe his favorite chew toy or ball.

Your dog should be free to leave the crate at all times when the training first begins.

Just to be safe, remove your dog’s collar before confining him to the crate. Even flat buckles on collars can occasionally get stuck on the bars or wire mesh of a crate.

If an open mesh or bar crate is used, cover the crate with a large towel or light throw to give him a ‘den’ feeling.

Be fully aware of the temperature of his surroundings. Never leave a crated dog outside during any season

Be certain that your dog has fully eliminated shortly before being crated. Rarely does a dog eliminate in a crate if it is properly sized and the dog is an appropriate age to be crated a given amount of time.

If your dog messes in his crate while you are out, do not punish him upon your return. Instead, simply wash out the crate using a pet odor neutralizer and give your best friend some clean bedding. Make sure that you always use pet friendly cleaners.

The cost of a crate can run between $35 and $150 depending on the size and the type of a crate.

The cost of not buying a crate could be your shoes, favorite articles of clothing, shredded books, chewed table legs, ripped couch cushions and of course damaged wiring. The real cost, however, is your dog’s safety and your peace of mind.

Don’t rush the process of introducing the crate to the dog. Start with the open door and gradually close the door for five to ten minutes at a time.

Gradually increase the time by five to ten more minutes per day. Stay close by so the dog won’t be frightened with the door closed.

You should put the crate beside your bed is you plan to keep the dog in it at night. Let him be able to see you and know that you are not far away.

When you first leave your dog, make your absence no more than a half hour with the maximum being no longer than an hour. Reassure him that you will be back soon and then do as promised.

If you plan to crate your dog while you are gone to work, it is important to have a friend or neighbor go over and let the dog out periodically.

Don’t think that the crate is an automatic babysitter for your pet. Success is not guaranteed. Each dog is an individual.

If, after all efforts at positive conditioning your dog to the crate have failed, then forcing the animal into such a situation is indeed inhumane and can result in physical injury when the dog tries to chew his way out.

There may be setbacks, but don’t give up. The keys are consistency and perseverance. Never make the dog feel as if he is being punished for something he did or did not do. With patience, the likelihood of the dog adjusting to the routine is very high.

Please understand this method is entirely up to the owner. It’s a choice, not a rule. If the idea makes you uncomfortable in any way, call VVHS at 634-7387 for other options.

We have phone numbers for some wonderful animal trainers in the Verde Valley that will gladly help you with behavior problems.

Don’t forget our Open House and pictures with Santa on Dec. 11 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. See you there!

Comments

Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comment submissions may not exceed a 200 word limit, and in order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.