An Evening of Stories, Drum, and Dance ... Vuse Baba Shibambo and the Rhythm Keepers with Arizona Dunun Ensemble

Vuse  Baba Shibambo is a Master Hand Drummer, an international touring performer and Recording Artist.  Born in South Africa, a Zulu, Shibambo translates into English as guardian of the skins, and the Shibambos were esteemed for their position as caretakers of the tribe’s animal skins for clothing and most importantly for their  drums.

Vuse Baba Shibambo is a Master Hand Drummer, an international touring performer and Recording Artist. Born in South Africa, a Zulu, Shibambo translates into English as guardian of the skins, and the Shibambos were esteemed for their position as caretakers of the tribe’s animal skins for clothing and most importantly for their drums.

Come and be a part of this Magical, Mystical Journey with Vuse Baba Shibambo and the Rhythm Keepers taking place at Sedona Creative Life Center in the Great Room on Friday, Oct. 15, 7-9 p.m.

Admission is $15 at the door. Vuse Baba Shibambo is a Master Hand Drummer, an international touring performer and Recording Artist.

Born in South Africa, a Zulu, Shibambo translates into English as guardian of the skins, and the Shibambos were esteemed for their position as caretakers of the tribe's animal skins for clothing and most importantly for their drums. Arizona Dunun Ensemble is a musical group comprised of players from Sedona, Cornville, Prescott, and Flagstaff, and specializes in West African percussion. The Dunun Ensemble is dedicated to learning traditional rhythms and songs which accompany the Djembe, or "Jebe Bara," which means Drum of Unity. Don't miss this evening of incredible drumming and energy, Friday, Oct. 15, 7-9 p.m. in the Great Room. $15/at the door.

About Baba Shibambo

Shibambo grew up during the Apartheid era. He began playing traditional African drums as a boy.

Proceeding years found him touring internationally with South African stage productions, both mu- sical and theatrical, even playing for Nelson Mandela. He is a multi-instrumentalist, playing percus- sion, African djembe, uudu, conga, marimba, mbira (kalimba or finger piano); even the haunting Bushman's bow.

Shibambo released his second CD, "African Skin on Skin" Reflections of a South African Hand Drummer, in 2004. The CD features Shibambo playing all the indigenous African instruments himself, as well as performing all the vocals to the music he has created.

It is a compilation of ancient African tribal rhythms; deeply hypnotic and mesmerizing. The listener embarks on a spellbound journey through rhythms and melodies intertwined with haunting, healing, often joyful, and always compelling vocals.

Shibambo successfully blends the age-old teachings of the elders of long ago Africa, with a reflection on his life through Apartheid era South Africa, and the more intimate personal trials in this modern-day world. Shibambo is available on tour, performing his music as a solo artist, accompanied by his back-up band, or as a keynote speaker on diversity. His unique,"Safari Rhythm of Culture in the Classrooms," Project has been successful in a variety of educational settings. From pre-school to university, he is warmly received and always rewarded by the students' interest in cultural diversity and their eagerness to learn and play the instruments he introduces to them.

About Arizona Dunun Ensemble

Arizona Dunun Ensemble is a musical group comprised of players from Sedona, Cornville, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona, and specializes in West African percussion. The Ensemble is dedicated to learning traditional rhythms and songs which accompany the Djembe, or "Jebe Bara," which means Drum of Unity.

They strive to share this music with others as accurately and as skillfully as possible and have a lot of fun making a big, joyful noise in the process. Over the past two decades the Djembe has become a hugely popular instrument all over the world, and in the United States it is often played without regard for African technique, tradition, and culture. Out of respect the Arizona Dunun Ensemble believes these aspects should be remembered when playing this instrument; and they strive to keep the Djembe in its traditional musical context, hence the name Arizona Dunun Ensemble.

In West Africa, the Djembe is almost always accompanied by one or more Dunun, a two-headed cylindrical drum played with a stick. The Dunun is vital to Djembe music! It is the engine that provides the "bass" notes and the melody. Dunun is pronounced "due noon."

For more information visit: www.azdunun.org

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