1864 WINE INTEREST: July 20, 1864

"California is evidently destined to be a great wine producing region. Her wine culture, now growing rapidly into a leading agricultural interest, dates only from the year 1854; but those ten years have produced remarkable results, for her wine growers send into the market excellent hocks, champagnes and ports, and the quality of many of the red and white wines already rivals that of many of the European varities."

"The history of the vineyard enterprises in California is brief. In 1854 Kohler and Frohling, assisted by Charles Stern, commenced business in Los Angeles, and shortly afterwards opened a house in San Francisco; in 1861 the State sent Mr. Harazthy to Europe to procure the best varieties of vines cultivated there, and the result of his expedition was the introduction into the State of fourteen hundred species, comprising one hundred thousand vines. This stimulated enterprise, and large numbers of persons planted vineyards and cultivated improved varieties of vines, so that the yeild of the wine crop has increased from 443,000 gallons in 1862 to an average annual product at the present time of 3,800,000 gallons."

"A large tract of land has recently been purchased by a German company, who have already planted three hundred thousand vines. Other private enterprises, sustained by ample capital and directed by skillful persons, promise good results."

"Arizona would, in many districts, seem to have the same advantages for grape culture that are found in southern California, and if proper attention be given to the matter, we make no doubt that within a few years our native and wholesome wines will be as famous and as attractive, if not as profitable, as our quartz lodes and placers."

(Arizona Miner; Camp Whipple; Arizona Territory; July 20, 1864; page 2.)

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