1899 ATROCIOUS MURDERS: Fugitive Chase Continues.

"SHERIFF MUNDS' CRIMINAL CHASE: Though Unsuccessful So Far the Pursuit is one of the Hardest and Most Dangerous in the History of Arizona Lawlessness."

"Sheriff Munds and his deputy Joseph Drew, arrived in Prescott yesterday. They came direct from the Clear Creek country in Gila county, where Bishop has taken refuge. In addition to what has heretofore been published in relation to the frightful deed committed at Camp Verde on the 2d of July, the sheriff gives somewhat of an interesting account of the pursuit of the criminal, and though unsuccessful in effecting his capture up to the present time he maintains, however, that sooner or later the last link in the chain will be welded and the murderer brought face to face with the fate that surely awaits him."

"Sheriff Munds states that his present field of operations is located about 110 miles from Camp Verde in what is known as the Clear Creek country and near Globe. The section he represents as well wooded and watered and abounds in an abundance of game and fish, affording thereby to the fugitive sources of food and shelter to sustain life for months to come."

"Concerning the abandonment of the chase Mr. Munds says that such reports are groundless, and on the contrary he maintains a force of ten men in the field, and persists in his former declarations that he will continue until all traces disappear, and personally be in the saddle to direct. Accordingly, his return is not to be weighed in the balance of a cessation of the pursuit, but on the contrary he will leave again in a few days to join his deputies and continue the work."

"Many versions of the crime are daily coming to the surface, but owing to the delicate nature of the web which surrounds the tragedy, many startling matters in connection with the man and his crimes must in consequence be kept from the public. However, it may truly be said that the plot to murder was carried out as a conspiracy, and unquestionably has associated to it a gang of murderers and robbers of the most daring types ever to infest the south west."

"Sheriff Munds says that on June 27th, six days before the murder of Wingfield and Rodgers, at Camp Verde, Bishop went into the town of Payson and purchased a gunnysack of condensed milk, many pounds of oatmeal and other light groceries, and left for the Clear Creek country. These goods Bishop "cached" at various places along Clear Creek, principally in the trees, and the sheriff states that many of these caches have been located by him."

"In the pursuit, Mr. Munds says that whenever bloodhounds would scent the trail they would invariably lead the posse to the foot of a tree, and it was then that the characteristics of these dogs would show up in the most piteous moans, as they looked up into the branches where food had been secreted. The rain was falling daily during the chase, and unless the trail was newly made, it was very difficult to make any headway."

"Mr. Munds states that at one time he believes that he and the posse were within a few feet of the fugitive, but owing to the rain falling so heavily and the density of the undergrowth he could not see nor could his dogs track. The fugitive is well supplied with food and in many of the camps he left, jerked turkey and bear meat were found in abundance in addition to condensed milk, and other prepared articles."

"Sheriff Munds, as well as others with him, believes that Bishop is in the canyon proper, or was at the time he left, and that in order to locate him or effect a capture, it will take time and necessarily occasion risk. Bishop seems to know what he is doing and knows how to evade the officers also. He is said to be an old hand at the business and in selecting a field to defy the law has a better knowledge of the country than any of his pursuers, and whether assisted or not by friends, is playing the game with all the cunning and skill of a Black Bart."

"The pursuit of this man is one of the longest and most trying in the criminal channels of Arizona lawlessness, a month nearly elapsing since the commission of the deed, and it is earnestly hoped that when Sheriff Munds is again in the saddle he will return with his man in custody."

(Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner; Prescott; August 2, 1899; page 1.)

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