Cottonwood adopts use policy for municipal logo

Tuesday, Cottonwood City Council unanimously approved the revised Logo Use Policy.

Oct. 17, Community Services presented the need for the city to have a Logo Policy to protect the citizen investment made regarding the city’s brand – “Cottonwood, The Heart of Arizona Wine Country.”

The intent of the policy is to provide an application process for perspective users so that the use of the city logo is controlled and to provide some return on the investment that the city has made in the logo.

Council approved of the concept, but asked that some minor changes be made to the policy. Changes included: a term limit of five years., revocable use with authority at the City Manager level, applicants shall have no unpaid debts or obligations, and that the policy may be amended in the future if deemed necessary.

“Bonafide” news organizations may use the City’s logo. “Bonafide” is a term the city came up with to separate news organizations from personal social media sites. City Attorney Steven B. Horton said the amendment can be revised if the exception is too broad or too narrow.

Youth Advisory Commission

Council unanimously approved appointing members to the Cottonwood Youth Advisory Commission.

Youth commission members Gunner Tillemans, Sofia Roche, Noemy Cervantes, Ruben Couyancy, Hannah Devore, Dallin Gordon, and John Valentine were re-appointed to another one-year term.

Kirsten Hastings will serve another term as community representative.

New applicants Jamee Chenoweth, Anisten Jones, Jehiah Rogers, Bringham Peterson and Rily Bliss were seated for the 2017-2018 year.

Zone Ordinance Procedures

There was a public hearing and first reading regarding Council-initiated zone changes being sent back to Planning and Zoning in every case.

Community Development staff has identified the need for an update in the procedures section of the existing zoning ordinance. This is due to concerns from the City Council in regards to project approvals, zone changes, and text amendments and the requirement for any modifications proposed/desired by Council to go back to the Commission for a report in every case before being voted on by Council. This sometimes creates unnecessary delays on projects and amendments, explained Community Development Planner Scott Ellis.

Council responded favorably to the ordinance.

Signs

There was a public hearing and first reading regarding a text amendment that would change the maximum height and size of freestanding signs in commercial districts.

It provides clarity, said Mayor Tim Elinski.

The Planning and Zoning Commission held a public hearing and considered the proposed Zoning Ordinance text amendment at their meeting Nov. 20 and recommended approval.

For buildings with 55 or less lineal feet of building frontage:

(1) The maximum total area for all signs shall be 80 square feet, including freestanding signs, except as allowed for single businesses with 20,000 square feet or greater of gross floor area, which may be allowed additional total sign area as described by this ordinance.

(2) Freestanding signs for buildings not located in shopping centers shall be allowed a maximum 40 square feet in area. The lesser dimension of the sign area of the freestanding sign shall not be less than one fifth the larger dimension.

For buildings with more than 55 lineal feet of building frontage:

(1) Buildings with more than 55 lineal feet of building frontage will be allowed one and one half square feet of sign area per lineal foot of building frontage.

(2) The maximum total area for all signs shall be 200 square feet, including freestanding signs, except as allowed for single businesses with 20,000 square feet or greater of gross floor area, which may be allowed additional total sign area as described by this ordinance.

(3) Freestanding signs for buildings not located in shopping centers shall be allowed a maximum of 40 square feet in area. The lesser dimension of the sign area of the freestanding sign shall not be less than one fifth the larger dimension.

To view the entire proposed text amendment, visit http://cottonwoodaz.gov/129/Agendas-Minutes.

Legal Protest

There was a public hearing and first reading regarding standards for protesting proposed rezoning.

It is a housekeeping item, said Community Development Manager Berrin Nejad.

The Planning and Zoning Commission held a public hearing and considered the proposed Zoning Ordinance text amendment at their meeting Nov. 20 and recommended approval as presented.

In May 2017, the Governor approved House Bill 2116 for amendments to Arizona Revised Statutes Section 9-462.04, regarding the standards and procedures for a legal protest to a proposed change of zoning. A text amendment to the Cottonwood Zoning Ordinance is proposed so as to ensure the Zoning Ordinance is in conformance with applicable statutes. The new legislation redefines how property owners are determined to be eligible to file a written protest against a proposed zoning amendment.

The Cottonwood Zoning Ordinance describes procedures for property owners to file a protest against a change of zoning. If a certain percentage of neighbors within a defined area protest, then approval requires 3/4 vote of the City Council. The existing Zoning Ordinance section describing these procedures is based on previous language in Arizona Revised Statutes. The proposed amendment is based on the new language in ARS.

Outdoor Lighting Code

There was a public hearing and first reading regarding the Outdoor Lighting Code.

The item was tabled and will be discussed at a future worksession.

At the direction of City Council, Community Development staff has been preparing to be a designated Dark Sky Community. Staff has been working with the International Dark Skies Association (IDA) and a small committee in order to make the current codes dark sky friendly.

An amendment was presented at the Nov. 20 regular meeting of the Planning and Zoning Commission. The motion was to recommend approval to the City Council.

Sedona, Camp Verde and Flagstaff are also working closely with the International Dark Skies Association (IDA) to be recognized as International Dark Skies communities.

One of the concerns from Council included the potential impact on tourism. Some council members stated that an entertainment district should be well lit.

The city will have 10 years to comply with the criteria.

After the resolution is approved, the application will be sent to IDA.

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