Jumping like a Navy Seal

Magdalena Romanska

Magdalena Romanska

I jump from planes. But I skydive in tandem because I don’t trust myself to open that parachute. (Plus, those plane-jumping dudes are always so good-looking.) For some strange reason, the tandem jumper attached to my back during the freefall always thinks that I know what I’m doing.

The idea is to jump then land at a target landing circle. I don’t admit it but the truth is I honestly have no idea where I’ll land. If I was jumping on the Fourth of July, I would just pray I didn’t finish in somebody’s backyard pool in the middle of their holiday barbecue.

So the dude and I jump. Once we are done with the upside-down, take your breath away, 100-miles-per-hour free fall part and stabilize ourselves in the air, I start seeing the little target dot, which is actually at the airport we left from. After the parachute is safely -- and in my case, miraculously -- deployed, they give me some commands and let me steer the parachute, putting both of our lives in my hands and obvious peril. I fervently hope that the dude knows how to drag us back to safety if I majorly screw something up.

I pull the strings back then pull them to the side, navigating. At least I think I’m navigating; the dude tightly attached to my back might be thinking very much otherwise. We proceed down, and the airport comes into clearer view. I see a few planes and the landing circle I need to bullseye.

I, ahem, “steer” some more, proudly thinking that I am in full control, and the circle grows larger and larger. I truly do not want it to grow any larger because I am so enjoying my flight through the sky. But we land, and it is precisely on the designated spot, to the relief of all the happy homeowners in the area, their barbecues and pools safe from an aerial invasion by me.

A few years ago, while jumping, it occurred to me that the process is very much like our work on becoming fit. We see that very vague “fit” dot on the curvy horizon. We focus on it. We go for it and steer our parachute towards it, with somebody’s help or without. The dot becomes larger and clearer. We focus some more on every single aspect of our journey to the dot that might make it truly reachable. We don’t get distracted by the wind. We don’t get distracted by how small the earth seems when we jump. We don’t get distracted by being afraid. No matter if it’s a few minutes, few months or a few years long. We focus and go for it.

And we get there.

Remember, I am here to help you steer toward your Fit-Fit dot.

Magdalena is the owner of the Be Fit Fit Personal Training Studio (www.befitfit.biz). Visit her BE FIT FIT blog at www.verdenews.com.

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