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Applicant pulls Rojo Grande development plans

Citizens cited environmental risks, traffic issues and maintaining the character of the neighborhood as some of the reasons to not support the development. VVN/Vyto Starinskas

Citizens cited environmental risks, traffic issues and maintaining the character of the neighborhood as some of the reasons to not support the development. VVN/Vyto Starinskas

SEDONA -- A plan to develop 600 manufactured homes just outside Sedona at the former El Rojo Grande Ranch has been pulled from the county agenda.

The plan was initially slated to be heard during the county supervisors’ regular meeting on Feb. 20, but has been withdrawn, according to Yavapai County Senior Planner Tammy Dewitt.

The applicant, Equity LifeStyle Properties, did not provide a reason why, according to Dewitt.

Rod Jarvis, the attorney representing ELS, could not be reached for comment.

In January, An estimated 300 people showed up to the Yavapai County Planning & Zoning Commission meeting to protest the development. Commissioners listened to more than six hours of public testimony and read several hundred emails and letters during their meeting.

Ultimately, commissioners unanimously voted to deny the proposal to develop a 172-acre senior-oriented manufactured home park.

Citizens cited environmental risks, traffic issues and maintaining the character of the neighborhood as some of the reasons to not support the development. Sedona City Council also declined support.

John Black lives adjacent to the Rojo Grande property. He said he was surprised ELS did not immediatly withdraw their application after P&Z's decision.

A website protesting the development, elrojograndesedona.com, noted that ELS’ withdrawal is a victory in a public post.

“We toast to El Rojo Grande Ranch maybe someday becoming the home of fine horses once again,” the post states.  “Enjoy the win, know that speaking up, standing up and showing up can lead to getting what is best for the communities you live in.”

Black said the next step for those interested in preserving Rojo Grande is to find a way to acquire the land from the owner.

"What we are trying to do is be proactive instead of reactive," he said.

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