TRUSTED NEWS LEADER FOR COTTONWOOD, CAMP VERDE & THE VERDE VALLEY
Fri, Sept. 20

1899 ATROCIOUS MURDERS: Prisoner "Black Jack" visited by District Attorney Ling.

"Telegrams received yesterday and today at the sheriff's office in this city from Clayton, New Mexico, state that the lone highwayman who attempted to hold up a train on a branch of the Santa Fe Pacific, near that place and who was badly wounded, answered the description of Bishop, the Verde Murderer. ... Nothing additional today has been received as to the nature of Bishop's wounds."

"Deputy Sheriff Davis left this morning for New Meico and will return with the wounded prisoner if it is the person wanted."

"Sheriff Munds and posse have been notified to abandon their chase, being at the present time on Clear Creek, near Holbrook."

(Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner; Prescott; August 30, 1899; page 3.)

"DISTRICT ATTORNEY LING TALKS ABOUT THE NEW MEXICO PRISONER."

"Judge Ling has the following to say in the Journal-Miner regarding his trip into New Mexico to try and bring back the man suspected of being the Camp Verde murderer."

"He says that had it not been for a misstep on the part of the sheriff of Union county, N. M., the man he was after would have been taken to Trinidad, Colo., and then from that state could have been extradited to Arizona without any trouble whatever. As it was, the sheriff turned the prisoner over to the United States marshal of New Mexico, which closed all avenues of extradition, for the time at least."

"Judge Ling says at Santa Fe he personally talked with the accused for over three hours, and gained sufficient information from his own lips, together with a description of the property he possessed at the time of the railroad hold-up, to connect him directly with the Camp Verde tragedy. The prisoner gave the name of Tom Ketchum, and while he stated that he was never in this section of Arizona, this was proved to be false by the statement which the two men in jail at Flagstaff made to the contrary, viz.: that Ketchum was seen by them in Tonto Basin soon after the Camp Verde deed, and they readily recognized the photo shown them by Judge Ling, and further said that it was that of Bishop. The latter name was evidently assumed by Ketchum, and these two men under arrest in Flagstaff are probably the only people Ketchum met in his flight from Camp Verde."

"Being pushed to the wall with questions, and while listening to the reading of the warrant by Deputy Davis, Ketchum became suddenly interested and displayed considerable nervousness of the limbs."

"Ketchum, Judge Ling says, was badly wounded, blood poison being apparent as a result of his gunshot wounds and but little hope was had for his recovery. Realizing this, Ketchum said he would, before the end came, make a full confession and unravel all deeds he was supposed to be associated with. He has made two attempts at suicide and failed in each, however, so there is very little probability he will tell anything, as his criminal career is a hard one and covers a long series of crimes for murder and robbery."

"Judge Ling further stated that Ketchum had a good face, and that none of the characteristic make-up of a bravado being noticeable, and though not illiterate, he possessed an off hand mode of expressing himself."

"Judge Ling has several of the photographs taken of Ketchum in jail, and they will be sent to Camp Verde for identification."

"Ketchum is not, however, the original "Black Jack," and personally says so himself. Jack was killed over three years ago. Since that time, Ketchum has been at times referred to as the original article."

"He is more familiarly known, however, as "Big Mose," while his partner travels under the name of "Little Mose." At any rate he belonged to a determined band of outlaws who have infested the southwest for years, acting sometimes in concert and at other times individually. And it is believed that one of the side trips was that which was made by Tom Ketchum to Camp verde, and that he was advised beforehand that he could profitably rob by murder, and accordingly carried the plot out as far as he was able, single handed."

(Jerome Mining News; September 4, 1899; page 3, columns 4-5.)

Contact
Event Calendar
Event Calendar link
Submit Event