TRUSTED NEWS LEADER FOR COTTONWOOD, CAMP VERDE & THE VERDE VALLEY
Mon, Jan. 20

1867: CAMP LINCOLN; Captain Weaver Died, June 21.

"DEATH OF CAPTAIN WEAVER."

"Powell Weaver, or Pauline Weaver, as he was commonly called, the noted trapper, and path finder and the oldest of the Arizona pioneers, is dead. His disease was congestive chills, and he expired at Camp Lincoln, on the Verde, 50 miles east of Prescott, on the 21st of June, where he was buried by the companies of the 14th regiment for which he had been acting as guide in Indian Scouting."

Mr. Weaver was a "veteran frontiersman, a native of Tennessee, known to all our people, and throughout the Rocky mountains and Pacific country, as an explorer of the old school, the companion of Carson, Bill Williams, Bridger, Leroux, Beckwouth and Uncle Joe Walker."

"He first came to Arizona in 1830, more than thirty years before its organization as a Territory, and in 1863, with Walker, he opened this central region, and the famous Weaver and Walker gold diggins."

"He rests after a career of three score years and ten so eventful that the simplest record if its incidents will read like a romance; his body sleeps, as he would have it, amidst the grand mountains which he loved to explore, and the rude solitude of which he preferred beyond all the excitement and ease of civilization and society."

"'Earth lie gently on his aged bones.'"

(Arizona Miner; Fort Whipple; July 13, 1867; page 2.)

Pauline/Powell Weaver is the son of Henry Weaver and his mother was Cherokee. He was born in Tennessee about 1797. (see: Sharlot Hall Museum Library and Archives.)

When Fort Verde was decommissioned in 1891, the graves at Camp Lincoln were dug up and the remains were reinterred at the National Cemetery in San Francisco, California.

Sharlot Hall and a group of people wanted to have the remains of Pauline Weaver, "Prescott's First Citizen," returned. The remains were shipped to Ruffner's, then there was a parade and formal burial ceremony at the Old Governor's Mansion on October 27, 1929.

Words on the new grave marker: "PAULINE WEAVER: TRULY A GREAT MAN; BORN IN TENNESSEE IN 1800, DIED AT CAMP VERDE JUNE 21, 1867."

"HE WAS BORN, LIVED AND DIED ON THE FRONTIER OF THIS COUNTRY, ALWAYS IN THE EVER ADVANCING WESTWARD MOVE OF CIVILIZATION AND WAS THE FIRST SETTLER ON THE SITE OF PRESCOTT. HE WAS DESCENDED FROM THE BEST BLOOD OF THE WHITE MAN AND THE NATIVE AMERICAN, AND HIS GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT WAS AS PEACEMAKER BETWEEN THE RACES, UNDERSTANDING AS FEW EVER DID THE TRUE HEARTS OF THE TWO PEOPLES.

Words at the corners are: PIONEER, PROSPECTOR, SCOUT, GUIDE, FREE TRAPPER, FUR TRADER, EMPIRE BUILDER, PATRIOT.

See: The Prescott Daily Courier; "Days Past: 'Prescott's First Citizen' Pauline Weaver comes home;" by Vicky Kaye; Part I, November 5, 2011, and Part II, November 12, 2011.

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