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Mon, Feb. 17

Verde Heritage 1920 ELECTIONS: "This Situation Is Nothing New"

"By Col. Winfield Jones, Special Correspondent of the 'Verde Copper News.'"

"Washington, Dec. 29. --- The Democrats will take some time in reorganizing their party and trying to recover from the debacle of the November elections. This was learned here today after interviews with leading Democrats of the House and Senate and other Democratic leaders. The opinion of practically all of these men coincides in the belief that plenty of time and much consideration should be given to the reorganization of the party."

"Soon after the November elections announcements were made by various Democratic leaders that steps would be immediately taken thoroughly to reorganize the party. These plans have now been abandoned, temporarily at least."

"A SECRET FIGHT: One of the principal factors that is holding back reorganization of the party is the quiet but intensive fight now going on among the members of the National Committee as to who shall gain control of the committee and thereafter, for 4 years at least, guide the national congressional destinies of the party. The National Committee has a deficit from the last campaign of about $300,000. Many committeemen feel that the deficit should be paid by the men in control of the party who contracted the debts and this, too, has acted to hold back a reorganization."

"LEADERS CONFER: Chairman George H. White, former chairman Homer Cummings, Secretary Tumulty, Finance Director Jamieson, and other of the leaders for some days have been conferring here over the situation. As this is written those leaders had not reached a conclusion as to just what program should be adopted, and from what could be learned it is probable a full reorganization is made. At least no steps will be taken toward that end until after Mr. Harding is inaugurated president March 4, next. It is believed that the deficit will be paid by then and soon thereafter the National Committee will meet in New York or Washington, and a complete reorganization will be made."

"PLANS FOR 1922: This reorganization will be in plenty of time for the National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Committee to get ready for the fight over the election of a new Congress in 1922. It is reported both committees intend to wage a vigorous campaign to try to overturn the great Republican House majority and the big Republican Senate majority in the Congress which was elected last November."

"MUCH BAD FEELING: It is known that a great deal of bitter feeling exists among high officials and members of the Democratic National Committee, and the Congressional Committee as well, over the defeat of the party in the November elections. This situation is nothing new because always after a political defeat the defeated fall out among themselves, instead of trying to find the real reason for the disaster, with a view of avoiding the defeat factors in the future."

"It would seem that after a defeat any party would draw closer together, among the leaders, at least, and try to reorganize on a harmonious basis for the next campaign. But this is never done. Personal animosities nearly always overbalance the plain fact that all must unite to retrieve the disaster and get ready for the next possible victory in the future."

"COMPLETELY DEMORALIZED: The fact is that the Democratic Party at this time is completely demoralized by the defeat in November, and it will be some time before the leaders can settle among themselves the bitter feelings engendered by the disaster of November. Until this is done, reorganization of the party seems to be a hopeless task."

"Until this is done, however, in time, and a revivified democracy will rise again to face the enemy in the congressional elections of 1922 and the next national election in 1924. Whether the party will get sufficient strength to 'come back' in either election remains to be seen. The Republicans believe it will be many years before the Democrats recover from their defeat. The Democrats, however, believe otherwise, and think they will have a fighting chance to control congress and the national government."

"OPPOSITION TO WHITE: The question just now is how the $300,000 deficit is to be paid, and who will succeed George White as Chairman, or shall White be allowed to remain at the helm. There is great opposition to allowing White to remain as Chairman, and it is not improbable that a new Chairman will be chosen when the real reorganization of the National Committee begins here after next March."

"Certainly the Republican leaders are not worrying over the situation. The longer Democrats delay their reorganization the better pleased will be the Republicans."

(Verde Copper News; Jerome; Wednesday, December 29, 1920; pages 1 and 2.)

"PROBABLE PERSONNEL OF HARDING'S CABINET."

"After weeks of consideration and consultation President-elect Harding is nearing a decision on several of his most important cabinet appointments. It may be authoritatively said that so far no such decision has been made and any suggestion he may have dropped on the subject have been of a tentative and indefinite in nature. It is equally certain, however, that in his talks here with leaders in many walks of life he has indicated clearly what men are uppermost in his mind.

(Verde Copper News; Jerome; Wednesday, December 29, 1920; page 1.)

"MINING BILL"

"Senator Henry F. Ashurst, Democrat of Arizona, went to the White House this afternoon for the purpose of getting what he described as 'a frank and manly announcement from President Wilson' as to whether the chief executive will sign the bill already passed by both houses of Congress extending for 6 months the provisions of the law requiring $100 worth of work to be done on every mining claim before midnight of December 31 each year." ...

"PEOPLE ARE ANXIOUS: The Arizona Senator said this afternoon that the claim-jumpers are 'sitting like blackbirds on a fence' waiting to jump claims at midnight on Friday night if the bill is vetoed by the President." ...

(Verde Copper News; Jerome; Wednesday, December 29, 1920; page 1.)

President Wilson signed this bill, so holders of mining claims kept their properties.

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