Cottonwood teachers, faculty walk in support of Red for Ed

The demand for more education spending includes better pay for teachers and more classroom funding. Arizona elementary teachers are paid 14 percent less than in 2001 when accounting for inflation, according to education advocacy group Expect More Arizona.  (VVN/Halie Chavez)

The demand for more education spending includes better pay for teachers and more classroom funding. Arizona elementary teachers are paid 14 percent less than in 2001 when accounting for inflation, according to education advocacy group Expect More Arizona. (VVN/Halie Chavez)

— Cottonwood Elementary School faculty donned red shirts and held signs as they stood on the sidewalk Wednesday morning in participation of the Red for Ed walk-in. The movement is now a state-wide demand in support of Arizona schools.

Passing cars honked in support.

“A walk-in is: we’re taking a stand but also teaching the students,” said Kathleen Little, a third-grade teacher.

The demand for more education spending includes better pay for teachers and more classroom funding. Arizona elementary teachers are paid 14 percent less than in 2001 when accounting for inflation, according to education advocacy group Expect More Arizona.

Fourth-grade teacher Brenda Lewis read the demands on behalf of the group.

“We the educators of Arizona want to see our professionals treated with respect and to ensure we provide the public education our students deserve. To achieve this goal, Arizona legislators and Gov. Ducey must meet our collective demands,” Lewis said.

Amid the demonstrations, Ducey said that he won’t meet with leaders teacher groups requesting negotiations to resolve Red for Ed demands.

As the faculty proceeded with the walk-in, elementary students formed an arm bridge for the teachers to walk under.

-- Follow Halie Chavez on Twitter at @haliephoto

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