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Film Festival and League of Women Voters present films Aug. 16-17


What does it mean to be an American revolutionary today? Grace Lee Boggs is a 98-year-old Chinese American woman in Detroit whose vision of revolution will surprise you. A writer, activist, and philosopher rooted for more than 70 years in the African American movement, she has devoted her life to an evolving revolution that encompasses the contradictions of America’s past and its potentially radical future.

What does it mean to be an American revolutionary today? Grace Lee Boggs is a 98-year-old Chinese American woman in Detroit whose vision of revolution will surprise you. A writer, activist, and philosopher rooted for more than 70 years in the African American movement, she has devoted her life to an evolving revolution that encompasses the contradictions of America’s past and its potentially radical future.


Originally Published: August 6, 2018 8:56 a.m.

The Sedona International Film Festival will partner with the League of Women Voters Greater Verde Valley to present two special film screenings Aug. 16-17 at the Mary D. Fisher Theatre.

The series will feature “I’m Carolyn Parker: The Good, the Mad, and the Beautiful” on Thursday, Aug. 16 and “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs” on Friday, Aug. 17. Each film will start at 7 p.m. on the respective evenings. There will be community discussions after each film screening.

I’M CAROLYN PARKER: THE GOOD, THE MAD, AND THE BEAUTIFUL

Thursday, Aug. 16 at 7 pm

Carolyn Parker was the last to leave her neighborhood when a mandatory evacuation order was decreed as Hurricane Katrina approached New Orleans in the summer of 2005. After the floodwaters subsided, Mrs. Parker was the first resident to return to her now flood-devastated community with what many thought was the “impossible dream” of bringing her ruined home back to life.

“I’m Carolyn Parker: The Good, the Mad, and the Beautiful” unfolds as an inspiring portrait of an extraordinary woman. Mrs. Parker takes us deep inside her personal biography as a child born in the 40’s, raised in segregated New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward, who became a teen-ager joining the front lines in the Civil Rights movement of the 60’s, who worked for thirty years as a cook-turned-chef in the hotel industry, and became one of the most outspoken voices in the fight for every New Orleanian’s right to return home after the devastation of the floods that followed Katrina. That Carolyn faced these odds with unbridled wit, spirituality and an abiding sense of social justice borne of her life in New Orleans makes for a unique cinematic tale of personal triumph.

“I’m Carolyn Parker: The Good, the Mad, and the Beautiful” is the portrait of an “ordinary family” who banded together under extraordinary circumstances, and reclaimed their home.

A community discussion will follow the screening.

AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY: THE EVOLUTION OF GRACE LEE BOGGS

Friday, Aug. 17 at 7 pm

What does it mean to be an American revolutionary today? Grace Lee Boggs is a 98-year-old Chinese American woman in Detroit whose vision of revolution will surprise you. A writer, activist, and philosopher rooted for more than 70 years in the African American movement, she has devoted her life to an evolving revolution that encompasses the contradictions of America’s past and its potentially radical future.

The documentary film, “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs”, plunges us into Boggs’ lifetime of vital thinking and action, traversing the major U.S. social movements of the last century; from labor to civil rights, to Black Power, feminism, the Asian American and environmental justice movements and beyond. Boggs’ constantly evolving strategy — her willingness to re-evaluate and change tactics in relation to the world shifting around her — drives the story forward.

Angela Davis, Bill Moyers, Bill Ayers, Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, Danny Glover, Boggs’ late husband James and a host of Detroit comrades across three generations help shape this uniquely American story. As she wrestles with a Detroit in ongoing transition, contradictions of violence and non-violence, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, the 1967 rebellions, and non-linear notions of time and history, Boggs emerges with an approach that is radical in its simplicity and clarity: revolution is not an act of aggression or merely a protest.

Revolution, Boggs says, is about something deeper within the human experience — the ability to transform oneself to transform the world.

A community discussion will follow the screening.

Tickets for each of the films are $12, or $9 for Film Festival members. For tickets and more information, please call 928-282-1177. Both the theatre and film festival office are located at 2030 W. Hwy. 89A, in West Sedona.

For more information, visit: www.SedonaFilmFestival.org.