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Once seen as loners, male elephants shown to follow elders

In this 2016 photo provided by researcher Connie Allen, male African elephants congregate along hotspots of social activity on the Boteti River in Botswana. Female elephants are well-known to form tight family groups led by experienced matriarchs, but males were long assumed to be loners because they leave their mother’s herd when they reach adolescence. Yet an emerging body of research is revealing the complex relationships of male elephant society, according to a study published Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020. (Connie Allen via AP)

In this 2016 photo provided by researcher Connie Allen, male African elephants congregate along hotspots of social activity on the Boteti River in Botswana. Female elephants are well-known to form tight family groups led by experienced matriarchs, but males were long assumed to be loners because they leave their mother’s herd when they reach adolescence. Yet an emerging body of research is revealing the complex relationships of male elephant society, according to a study published Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020. (Connie Allen via AP)

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